I’ve Often Thought About Why I Am Different

The fact that our brains are reprogrammable can lead us to the erroneous conclusion that we can modify our personalities, which appears not to be the case, beyond minor changes.

Today, I dined on crisps and chocolate-covered coconut bars. Also, two slices of ham that tasted off, with some tomatoes and fake cheese, in a sandwich. I can’t eat wheat without consequences, so there’s that. The bread was 25 pence per 800g loaf. I bought two. I eat what I can afford.

I’ve often thought about why I am so different from other people. Others have no problem applying themselves to essential tasks such as working for money. They are able to apply themselves even when hate what they do. Now I know it’s just that my brain is different. Obvious really. Then again, the fact that our brains are reprogrammable can lead us to the erroneous conclusion that we can modify our personalities, which appears not to be the case, beyond minor changes. I know I can’t change, having spent over thirty years trying.

The only times I’ve had any success, like a normal person, have been when the environment has been right – when there has been no pressure to look for work. There is little chance of finding such an environment today, in this country.

“But John,” they say. “The real world doesn’t work the way you want it to.”

Well, that’s what I’m objecting to. As a small-minority personality type, INTPs are poorly catered for by politicians who are willing to get the environment right for the entrepreneurial types and the worker bees. Entrepreneurs who say they can thrive in any environment, nevertheless campaign for “business-friendly” political policies.

I am low on hope.